More entries from my Toddler-speak lexicon

By the way, "beast!" is another good word to get kids to smile for pictures

“Booty ana Beast!” Outside the Lego store at Downtown Disney

Since I did get a few requests after my Blup blups post, I had to share a few more entries from my son’s Toddler-speak lexicon. As he continually expands and refines his language usage, I try to write them all down. [Read more…]

Blup blups

“Dada! Blup blups!”

When he has a blup in is hand, he wields it with deadly force.

When he has a blup in is hand, he wields it with deadly force.

This is perhaps my newest favorite of my son’s phraseology. It means golf clubs (or flip flops, or bathtub, depending on the context.)

For a long time now, I have been writing down all of his verbiage to develop a personal lexicon for those who wish to speak with him. It’s helpful for family and babysitters, but mostly, I just treasure it. I love adding everything I hear to it and it’s getting quite impressive. By my count my son regularly uses at least 175 words/phrases. I don’t know where that is on the bell-curve, but people are often impressed how well he uses language and expresses things. He conveys emotions and ideas well, even at two years of age and without the articulation.

In my experience, a lot of parents are hyper-concerned about the language and cognitive abilities of their toddlers. Especially with boys.

He’s struggling with language so we’re putting him in speech therapy.
Me: How old is he?
Sixteen months.
Me: [Pause] Give him time.

I tell all of them pretty much the same thing: don’t worry. I’ve worked with children with officially diagnosed delays, like autism; that’s a different situation, and there’s a lot of hope with those. But every child is different, and the most important thing is guarding their environment (which parents CAN do something about) and giving them a place to learn well, rather than directing their language (which parents really CAN’T do much about.)

For example, challenge them to speak so that they really get what they want. When my son just whines for something, I tell him clearly, “I don’t know what you want. Tell me. Try to use words.” He virtually always makes a go for it.

Maybe I’ll share more of his words as time goes along.

For those who can’t talk real good…

Top 10 Mispronunciations that are more annoying [to me] than “nucular.”

I know that ‘nucular’ gets some extra time in the hot seat because of politicians, but there are mispronunciations that are much more bothersome to me. I come across them more often, so maybe that has something to do with it.

Call me weird, but I really appreciate being corrected when I say something wrong, so that I don’t sound ignorant, disrespectful, or dumb. It doesn’t have to be in a mean way. (I really have to work on my approach. I’ve recently learned I have a blunter, sharper delivery than I ever imagined.)

I would love it if you would leave a comment with one or two that really should be on this list. It’s good to say things right. 😉

Expresso–As in, “Can I get an extra shot of expresso?” I suppose if you are referring to espresso’s occasional natural diarrhetic effect…then it’s fitting.

Perfek–As in, “That dive was a perfek ten!” If E is your SL, then I understand. It’s not easy at first.

Comferble–As in, “This chair is so comferble.” I know the true pronunciation sounds ridiculous, but at least give a nod to the central ‘t’ with the conventional “comftorble.”

Chai Tea–Since “chai” or something close to it is the word for tea throughout the Asian continent, the “tea” is simply redundant.

Worcestershire–You know you can’t say it either.

I don’t know if I’m picking on the word, or on the institutionalized butchering of it, but it sure is good stuff to cook with, irregardless.

(Doh!)

Irregardless–It’s in the dictionary now with the “nonstandard” tag. So I don’t dwell on it. But it is a double negative, still.

Punkin–As in, “Can I get some punkin pie.” I prefer ‘bumpkin’ if you are going to botch the beloved gourd.

Ornch–Why does anyone say “orange” when they refer to the fruit form, but in the next sentence ask for a glass of “ornch juice”?

Gowda–As in the cheese.

Orientated–When instead the person means “oriented” as in positioned in a certain way.

-eh!–This suffix is increasingly affixed to the last word of many sentences proceeding from the mouths of certain persons (I won’t say which gender), of a certain socioeconomic bracket (middle-upper), and especially from a certain region (I live in Huntington Beach.) Usually used for emphasis. Examples are:

  • Oh my gawd-eh!
  • That’s SO random-eh!
  • She was TOtally wasted-eh!.
  • (“-uh!” is a variation, of course.) NOooo-uh!