No such thing as a Real Job

Always under construction

Confession: I turned my work into a job and the world that mattered the most to me into work.

Lemme ‘splain.

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Mental Illness and the Christian Church

The Church can be a very sorry companion for the mentally ill, but also can be the greatest source of hope

Someone sent this article to me, and I found it short, but so beneficial, that I had to share it here.

Looking at the world through a glass, darkly

PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay

 

Brandon W. Peach writes about many topics, but his understanding and experience with mental illness and the Church’s broadly (but not always) ill-conceived overall response to it–as well-intended as it may be–is more encouraging than anything else.

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Connecting Dots

He doesn't know a way out, but knows a way IN, Precious...

Figuring OUT

 

Sometimes I connect dots, of which I do not know whether they are supposed to connect.

I have to try. If I don’t, how can I make any sense of “supposed to”?

*Warning* If you require only happy posts, this one is not for you. It does have light at the end of it though.

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Yes drill sergeant

My twisted-side ego is like a drill sergeant but one that wants me to fail. It screams in my face when I screw up, fall down, question things.

Real drill sergeants, however, ultimately want you to succeed…or quit.

But wait, maybe that negative side of me is harassing me in order to help me succeed in the end. Could it be that there is a nobler purpose in that berating, negative psyche?

ArmyAmber / Pixabay

Bear with me now…

How could something from me want me to fail? Maybe this thing is EXACTLY like a drill sergeant. Maybe I should just answer “yes drill sergeant!”

You freakin idiot! Go faster! “Sir, yessir!”

Look what you did, Lewis! Stop it or you’ll ruin everything! “Sir, yessir!”

 

I think I heard Titus once say that anxiety is good because that’s how the rent gets paid.

 

 

Revisiting great books: Possibility of Metaphysics

I’m working on getting back to reading things I love, as well as books that are very helpful, useful, and recommended to me. I believe it’s necessary to inspire me on and focus on the future.

One such book is The Possibility of Metaphysics. I love how Lowe is brash but efficient with his words, and that he gives a wake up call to the rebirth and reality of Metaphysical philosophical enterprise.

Stay tuned for notes… 😉

Reflecting on sense

“Isn’t that interesting…”

Mind is a Parachute

“Your mind is like a parachute.”

–Andy Argyris

It only works when it opens

Your Mind is a Parachute

Like a parachute, it works when it’s open. It saves you’re life when it opens. It turns your enemies (gravity, wind resistance) into your best friends.

If it stays closed, you will perish.

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Bandu — A Game Imitating Life

Bandu

I think everyone should play Bandu. It’s a game illustrating life, really.

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Make a Fist: Nature’s Improvised Antidepressant

This is a grouper.

Grouper

Depression, staring you down, wondering if it can eat you

They get huge.

I visited the Bahamas with my family as a teenager. I remember the guide who took us snorkeling–Levi was his name–and how he told me that he used to feed fish at the aquarium. He fed these giant grouper which, he said, were so big that sometimes when he held out the food they would try to swallow his whole arm. I thought that was a little unnerving but he was, of course, completely nonchalant.

“How do you make them let go?” I asked him.

“You just make a fist in their mouth, and push. Then they back off.”

 

I sometimes get the feeling that my ego, depression, circumstances, whatevah, are slowly trying to swallow me like a big, ugly fish. Sometimes I don’t even need an equal or greater opposing force–all I have to do is make a fist, and push. Every time I do, it reminds me who is doing the feeding here and who is in charge.

 

Camping with a toddler is a GO!

I was blessed to go camping with my family–my wife and son–this past weekend. I want to highlight this great little getaway and my joy in being with them. Also, I ignored a warning against camping with a toddler (specifically a 2-year-old), and I’m glad I did.

 

Fire! I have made fire!

alexis / Pixabay

 

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Distortion 2: Overgeneralization

I’m beginning a series on some of David Burns cognitive distortions. It helps me to really see them for what they are and how I apply them to my thinking. Hopefully it will help someone else realize they are doing it too to their detriment.

◊ Overgeneralizing takes isolated cases or truths and makes wide, sweeping assertions about many more cases–or even all cases. Generalizing is another type of heuristic that helps us to grasp and categorize things. Inducing what will happen next based on what you’ve experienced is obviously an important skill. It’s generally safe to believe, for example, that since you nearly burned your eyebrows off the last time you left the gas on too long before you lit the grill, it will probably happen again if you wait just as long…and the same goes for any gas grill you dare to light.

◊ Obviously, this is a valuable cognitive skill. Even animals do it. But it takes a turn for the nasty when it is used to protect us from what we don’t know or understand. I’m talking about discrimination and prejudice that is irrational, bitterness, and pessimism. Combined with the fact that our brains are wired to hold onto negative events and losses more tightly than positive ones, this all becomes very natural. Murphy probably only had to drop his buttered toast a couple of times before he discovered “a law.”

◊ I have laughed until I nearly cried at things like despair.com. Their success is based on overgeneralization of stuff we’d rather not experience or witness. But I laugh like a sad clown–nobody in their right mind finds these really putting smiles of joy on their faces. The smiles demotivators invoke are smiles along the lines of “as long as it doesn’t happen to me..this time.”

I’ve learned that even though this distortion is easy to adopt in order to feel smarter and that I somehow won’t be duped by anyone, it makes me really annoying to people who catch onto me. It makes me a Debbie Downer, who focuses on what will probably go wrong. But worst of all, opportunities go flying by me because I see them coming for a fleeting moment and go, “Meh, wouldn’t work anyway.” Better to keep the cognitive skill as a way to be prepared and remember that each new opportunity is in fact new.