Humanarium Revisited

Humanarium (Revisited)

(ˈhjuːmən err-e-um)

n. an abstract but primal place. A place where you can be as human as humanly possible and feel no shame, because even shame is on par with pride, justice, and glory.

  1. : a place where you can lean against your enemy almost as equally as your friend and you have nothing to prove.
  2. : a place where one can talk about holiness and earthiness in the same sentence.
    • a : it is difficult to tell if such places are created only by great effort, or rather by merely forgetting that one ever left them.
    • : a place that a good church tries to replicate, but rarely achieves.
  3. : a place where the only way to offend everyone is by being pretentious. But even then, everyone just shakes their head with pursed lips and then pats said pretentious one on the back and moves on, because they are too busy seeking reality.
  4. : a place where one’s age is meaningless. Where one is a child and a burdened adult and in the twilight at the same time.
  5. : a state in which one understands Bob Dylan songs, and/or feels like they are living in a permanent Bob Dylan song.
  6. : a place where children thrive and move and have their being, and elderly smile like no one is watching.
  7. : a space in which one can be honest, not afraid of the consequences.
  8. : a place where one can lift up their head high and not feel above anyone else.
  9. : a space where one can meet God, herself, himself, or their great love–with equal intensity.
  10. : an atmosphere where it’s almost impossible to tell if one is laughing or crying. Or doing both simultaneously. But you have to let them do it. They need it.
  11. : places where a friend, even for only a few minutes, is a friend for a lifetime.
  12. : a place saturated with that feeling, when one has been drinking, that comes after trying to be the life of the party and trying to run away from the party; when you’re right in the zone of total vulnerability and surrender but have not lost any of your faculties.
  13. a place where your political affiliations mean about as much as your hair color.

Seek these places once in a while. Create them when needed.

 

Shine your Light (per Joni Mitchell)

xshine
[OCTOBER 23, 2016]

I saw a video of Prince accepting an award. Terse as he was whenever I saw him, not seeming to enjoy talking publicly outside of music too much, and not dropping many names, one of the few performers that he propped up and praised in that speech was Joni Mitchell.
I wondered why he mentioned her as a prime influence. Of all the people who had influenced him; I just had never known. Indeed, she is amazing. I’m glad he did it.
I think during this season, in this climate, in this hour, a song like this one is very timely; politics aside. I think it may show part of why Prince loved her so much.
(for the audiophiles, here you go)

Shine

Oh let your little light shine
Let your little light shine
·
Shine on Wall Street and Vegas
Place your bets
Shine on the fishermen
With nothing in their nets
Shine on rising oceans and evaporating seas
Shine on our Frankenstein technologies
Shine on science
With its tunnel vision, tunnel vision
Shine on fertile farmlands
Buried under subdivisions
·
Oh let your little light shine
Let your little light shine
·
Shine on the dazzling darkness
That restores us in deep sleep
Shine on what we throw away
And what we keep
Shine on Reverend Pearson
Who threw away
The vain old God
Kept Dickens and Rembrandt and Beethoven
And fresh plowed sod
Shine on good earth, good air, good water
And a safe place
For kids to play
Shine on bombs exploding
Half a mile away
·
Oh let your little light shine
Let your little light shine
·
Shine on world-wide traffic jams
Honking day and night
Shine on another asshole
Passing on the right
Shine on the red light runners
Busy talking on their cell phones
Shine on the Catholic Church
And the prisons that it owns
Shine on all the Churches
They all love less and less
Shine on a hopeful girl
In a dreamy dress
·
Oh let your little light shine
Let your little light shine
Shine on good humor
Shine on good will
Shine on lousy leadership
Licensed to kill
Shine on dying soldiers
In patriotic pain
Shine on mass destruction
In some god’s name
Shine on the pioneers
Those seekers of mental health
Craving simplicity
They traveled inward
Past themselves…
·
May all their little lights shine

[Read more…]

Why They Call It a Crazy Train

There are reasons people call it a Crazy Train

Huffing, puffing, fuming

44833 / Pixabay

Like a train, crazy is big. It’s heavy. It can’t be steered–only directed by planned pathways. It’s loud and dangerous. It’s thundering and crushing. It carries virtually incalculable weight.

However, it can be jumped from provided one accounts for the risks and pain of jumping. And–with great amounts of effort, energy, and time–it can be stopped.

Crazy momentum

WikiImages / Pixabay

Aronofsky’s Noah is Gnostic?

Really interesting article on why Noah is not a gnostic film. It does a great job of briefing readers on the tenets of Kabbalah and Gnosticism too, some of which I never knew.

Even though this was a parenthetical, I found it really interesting and not surprising:

This is something to keep in mind, by the way, when people casually describe Aronofsky as an “atheist”. See also this interview in The Atlantic, where Aronofsky, asked about his spirituality, said: “I think I definitely believe. My biggest expression of what I believe is in The Fountain. And that kind of sums it up. And it’s hard for me to put it into words to describe. That’s why I made a movie about it. I tried to do it in sound and image and in dialogue and character. If people want to get a sense of what I’m thinking and doing, I still subscribe to the ideas in that movie.

Always leave room for hope. 😉

 

Noah: the film and the hot controversy

Noah: The controversy is expected, but the scale of the controversy surprises me

As implied in my last post, I am finally adding to the cacophonous hysteria about Noah.

I liked it. Let me tell you why.

Imagine, if you can, watching the whole world you’ve come to know literally wash away.

I felt well-enough informed after reading Phil Cooke’s piece on the film, knowing how solid he is on all the related issues, and because he had actually seen it. I trust him and his opinion on most things. So I had nothing to fear, and I wanted to be clued in on discussions.

[Read more…]

Humanarium

Sometimes, the real church is taking place out on the front steps

Question: Which side of the door is the church on?…

Humanarium: Creating a Space for Authentic Relationship

On a recent Monday, I was listening to Dr. John Coe talking about honesty being the meta-virtue which is the basis for all the spiritual disciplines.

Did you catch that?

The basis of all the spiritual disciplines, and the highest virtue of them all, is honesty.

[Read more…]

Mental Illness and the Christian Church

The Church can be a very sorry companion for the mentally ill, but also can be the greatest source of hope

Someone sent this article to me, and I found it short, but so beneficial, that I had to share it here.

Looking at the world through a glass, darkly

PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay

 

Brandon W. Peach writes about many topics, but his understanding and experience with mental illness and the Church’s broadly (but not always) ill-conceived overall response to it–as well-intended as it may be–is more encouraging than anything else.

[Read more…]

Women opt for divorce 2 out of 3 times

I heard an interesting statement recently, from a psychologist I know. Not only do women choose divorce 66% of the time over men, but they view their husbands very differently, throughout and after. “Women, who are more relational, view their husbands as chapters in their lives, and can move on more easily. Men have a harder time in divorces–they see the whole book as about their wives, and therefore now have to go and get a whole new story.”

This would explain a lot of the other stats on men and the fallout of divorce. Peter Pan Syndrome is just the beginning.

God, help us.

Sin in our Role and Identity

I came across this author’s critique of Pope Francis saying that we humans are sinners.

The headline pulled me in as ridiculous, because it’s pretty basic, fundamental doctrinal stuff. Good luck trying to blame the pope for that.

God reached out to us because He Loves us, not because He owed us one.

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Feminism: Blaming isn’t Helping

I saw this comment on Huffington Post and I’m glad it ties up the problem so succinctly. It’s in response to Elisabeth Hasselbeck’s question to Nick Adams about men in decline because of feminism.

“How, specifically, are men not allowed to “be manly”? Not allowed to get away with rape? Not allowed to beat up other men without being arrested? What are the benchmarks here….Are men not being allowed to play football? Hunt? Curse? Drink beer? Good grief. Tell us, Elisabeth – how are our men “less masculine”. Because I see men working hard every day. Being good husbands, fathers, and friends. They’re providing for their families. They’re always learning new technology. They’re traveling. They’re reading, creating, being imaginative. They’re enjoying life. So…tell us. How are they “not masculine’?”

We’re men, we’re men in tights

Here would be my response to Phyllis T (if I wanted to sign up for Huff Post, which I don’t):

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